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“Blessed Are the Peacemakers”

INDEX:

 

Commemorate Native American Day with this inspiring lesson featuring a video clip of bravery shown by the great PEACEMAKER Pocahontas from the Animated Hero Classic series. Your family will be blessed as they,also, strive to be peacemakers. The paper weaving activity and authentic "Native American" pudding are sure to make this a fun time for all!

 

SONG

SCRIPTURE

VIDEO CLIP


LESSON SUMMARY

POINTS TO PONDER

 

STORY

TREAT
TIME

ACTIVITY

ACTIVITY PAGES

 

VIDEO CLIP:
The Animated Hero Classics: Pocahontas chapters 12–13

(click on above for full screen)

PRINCIPLE:
Peacemaking

 

 

PRINT THIS ENTIRE LESSON

 

20-MINUTE LESSON

   

SONG

 
 

Children’s Songbook #78 “I’m Trying to Be like Jesus.”

If you wish to print sheet music or have an online music file to accompany you click on the song link to visit: http://www.lds.org/churchmusic

SCRIPTURE

Matthew 5:9

 

9. Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God.

VIDEO

Watch chapters 12–13 from the Animated Complete Learning System, Pocahontas DVD or CLICK FOR CLIP

 

LESSON SUMMARY

 
 

For younger children, it may be helpful to summarize the following ideas:

 

What does it mean to be “Blessed”? (See Matt 4:9. Blessed means happy, favored, and glorified.)

What is a peacemaker? (A person who brings about or promotes peace.)

What is the promise the Savior gave associated with Peacemakers? (“...for they shall be called the children of God.” (3 Nephi 12:9, Matthew 4:9).

President Henry B. Eyring taught, “The Savior said, ‘And blessed are all the peacemakers, for they shall be called the children of God.” (3 Nephi 12:9). When I read that as a boy, I wondered about the promise. It didn’t sound like anything very glorious. But I see now that the promise is both glorious and sure. Those who will have eternal life are the children of God.” Henry B. Eyring, Friend, Jul 2009 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

We are all God’s children, but to be called “the children of God” means that you are trying to be like Heavenly Father and Jesus Christ who is the “Prince of Peace.” ( See Isaiah 9:6.) Every time we are loving or kind or forgiving or helpful, we are doing the things that Heavenly Father does and are becoming more like Him.

Do you think Pocahontas was a peacemaker? (Discuss thoughts.)

“Except for the raw courage of Native American princess, Pocahontas, the English settlers at Jamestown in the early 17th century would have died from starvation and exposure. Her brave intervention saved the settlers’ lives and brought peace between two very different peoples.” (Excerpt from Animated Hero Classics Pocahontas packaging.)

Do we need peacemakers, like Pocahontas, in the world today? (Discuss thoughts.)

“Because of the long history of hostility upon the earth, many feel that peace is beyond hope. I disagree. We can learn to love our fellow human beings throughout the world. Whether they be Jewish, Islamic, or fellow Christians, whether Hindu, Buddhist, or other, we can live together with mutual admiration and respect, without forsaking our religious convictions.” Russell M. Nelson, Ensign, Nov 2002 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

POINTS TO PONDER

 
 

What can we do to follow the Savior’s admonition to be peacemakers in our home? (Discuss ideas.)

“Certainly in our homes, as well as elsewhere, we can all be peacemakers by exhibiting love and goodwill, thus offsetting the evil of contention, envy, and jealousy. Where
misunderstandings exist between children and parents we can encourage adjustments on the part of both. We can pray together for the spirit of peace.” Franklin D. Richards, Ensign, Nov 1983 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

“Pocahontas was baptized as a Christian, and married John Rolfe in 1614. This marriage created the ‘Peace of Pocahontas,’ six years of peace between the Jamestown colonists and Powhatan’s tribes.” David Morenus, The Real Pocahontas.

Quotes:

“To follow Christ and bring forth the blessings of heaven, we must actively make peace in the world, in the community, in the neighborhood, and above all, in the home we live in.” Robert E. Wells, Ensign, May 1991 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.


“If we follow the example of Jesus Christ and become true peacemakers, that flood of love will cover the earth as with a blanket.” Theodore M. Burton, Ensign, Nov 1974 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

STORY

"Making Peace"

 

“Dad, can Peyton and I have the leftover pipe from the sprinkler system?” Lizzy asked.

“It’s for a secret project we’re working on,” Peyton added.

Father smiled at his two daughters. “Does this mean you two are friends today?” He teased.

“We’ll always be friends, Dad,” Peyton answered.

“Sometimes we just get on each other’s nerves,” Lizzy added.

After Father agreed to let the girls have the PVC pipes they ran to the shed to retrieve them. “They’re longer than I remember,” Peyton moaned, while pulling one of the ten-foot pipes out of the shed. “And there are only three
of them!”

“Three and a half!” Lizzy exclaimed, picking up a five-foot section of PVC pipe. “If Dad will cut the others in half we’ll have seven. That should be enough. They’re too long, anyway.”

While Father cut the three PVC pipes the girls rummaged through the garage and the house for the rest of the supplies they needed. “Dad, can we have this old rope?” “Mom, do you have an old sheet we can have?”
“I’ll get the magic markers ...”

“Do we have everything?” Lizzy asked Peyton.

“We don’t have any scissors. Mom wouldn’t let me have them,” Peyton protested. “She said last time I borrowed her good scissors I ruined them and she had to get a new pair. I guess they’re not made for cutting a tin can!” she said sheepishly. “But, she also said she would help us when we get to that part.”

“Okay, then. Let’s get to work,” Lizzy said with enthusiasm. “Where’s the markers?”

The girls drew pictures on the sheet. Then they tied part of the rope around the top of the pipes. Together they struggled with the awkward pipes. After several attempts they finally were able to stand them up like a seven legged tripod.

Logan peddled his big wheel into the back yard where the girls were sitting on the lawn taking a break.

“I bet I know what you’re making,” Logan stated. “Can I help?”

Page 2

   
 

“Well, duh! It’s not hard to tell now that it’s almost done,” Peyton answered. “And the answer is; No you can’t help! You’re too little. ”

Logan scowled. “Am not too little! I’m strong!” Logan shouted, before pushing the pipes. Lizzy looked stunned
at the heap of pipes that had tumbled to the ground.

“I’m going to get you for that, Logan,” Peyton shouted.

Lizzy knew she needed to do something and quick! Scrambling, she jumped between her two siblings with her arms spread out. “This isn’t getting us anywhere,” she said in a calm voice. “We all need to try and be more like Jesus.”

Peyton let out a big “sigh” before slumping into a heap herself next to the fallen pipes.

Lizzy tried to comfort her little brother, who was now crying. “Do you still want to help us, Logan? I think we could use some help standing the pipes back up!”

Logan nodded his head before stooping down to help his two sisters pick up the pipes.

“It’s going to be a teepee. Isn’t it?” Logan whispered.

Peyton winked at Lizzy. “You’re pretty smart for a little guy! And boy, you’re right!” Peyton cajoled. “You are strong. You should have seen Lizzy and I trying to put these teepee poles up the first time. It was a sorry sight. Poles falling all over the place. But with your help, it was a snap. I’m sorry I was so mean to you. Will you
forgive me?”

 

 

Logan’s toothless grin made Peyton smile. “Are you really making a teepee?” he asked.

“Nope!” she answered. “We’re making a teepee. Me, Lizzy and you.”

***

That’s an awesome picture of an eagle, Logan,” Lizzy complimented.

“I knew how to draw it,” Logan replied, “’cause I saw it in my book about Native Americans.”

“It was just what our teepee cover needed,” Peyton added. “Let’s go get Mom and Dad, now. We need their help to put this cover on and to cut a hole for the door.”

***

The family worked together to tie the covering to the poles with the remaining rope. Mother then cut out a half rectangle for the door. Father pulled the door flap back and Mother sang, “One little, two little, three little Indians,” as the children climbed into their teepee.

“We’re not Indians, Mom. We’re Native Americans,” Logan corrected. “And Lizzy’s Pocahontas ’cause she’s got hair like hers!” he stated while playfully tugging on one of Lizzy’s long black braids.

Peyton put her arms around her two sibblings. “And, like Pocahontas, Lizzy’s also a PEACEMAKER!”

by Margie Nauta Lee © 2010 Living Scriptures, Inc.

 

TREAT TIME

CLICK TO PRINT “Native American Cornmeal Pudding Cups” recipe

Native American Cornmeal Pudding Cups

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Bake Time:40 minutes

Directions:

 

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. In a big pan on the stove top, bring the milk to a boil. Gradually add the cornmeal, stirring rapidly to keep lumps from forming. Lower heat and beat vigorously until it starts to get thick (about three minutes). Remove from heat. Add butter, sugar, spices, maple syrup and apples. Let cool. Stir in beaten egg. Pour into prepared (12 count) muffin tin and bake for 40-45 minutes or until pudding is firm.

Treat Time:

This easy, versatile dish was introduced to the American Colonists by the Native Americans. It’s a simple cornmeal mush made with milk and sweetened with maple syrup and fruit. It’s served warm. You can top it with whipped cream, ice-cream or vanilla yogurt.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 3/4 cup yellow cornmeal
  • 3 T. butter
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup maple syrup
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 1 egg (beaten)
  • 1/4 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp. cloves
  • 2 tsp. ginger
  • 1/8 tsp. allspice
  • 1/4 tsp. nutmeg
  • 1/2 cup chopped apples or raisins
 
 

ACTIVITY

 

Activity: Younger children will need help from an older sibling or parent.

 

1. Explain: Weaving has been important throughout the Native American culture since ancient times. Native American’s, like Pocahontas, knelt before looms and wove
colored threads together into designs that ofttimes depicted a part of their lives.

2. Ask: What is a tapestry? (A piece of fabric with pictures or designs formed by weaving colored threads, used as a wall hanging.)

3. Explain: Together as a family we are going to weave a small tapestry out of paper. (Show the loom.) For each “thread” (show strips of paper) that is woven into the loom we will discuss situations where we can be peacemakers.

4. Ask: What is a peacemaker? (A peacemaker is someone who helps others be happyinstead of angry.)

5. Weaving activity: (After each situation ask: What will you do to be a peacemaker?) Start with situation (a). Weave strip #1 into the loom. (See diagram.)

a. Your younger sister kicked over your block tower.

b. Your siblings are fighting over the last piece of cake.

c. During a ball game a player on the other team trips you.

d. Your brother grabs the TV remote out of your hands.

e. A classmate makes fun of your art project.

f. You’re trying to sleep and your sister is being noisy.

g. You finally get a chance to play a video game and your friend wants a turn.

h. Your friends won’t let the new girl play because she’s of another faith.

i. Your brother wants to play with the toy you’re playing with.

j. Some neighborhood kids are making fun of another child because he doesn’t speak English very well.

k. The boy who sits behind you in class is always pulling your hair.

6. When you’ve finished weaving, turn over and tape along edges to hold strips in place. Make small cuts along left and right edges to make a fringe. Read the message on
tapestry and bear testimony of the happiness that comes from being a peacemaker.

7. During the upcoming week choose a child each day who has been a peacemaker and award them the tapestry to hang in their room or on their door.

What you need:

A copy of “Weaving Peacemaker” activity (artwork included with this lesson), cardstock and glues or self-adhesive laminating sheets, tape and scissors.

 

Preparation:

1. Print out the artwork.

2. Laminate or glue cardstock to artwork.

3. Cut out numbered strips on first sheet and stack in numerical order. These will be the threads.

4. Cut along dotted lines on second sheet. This will be the loom.

 
 

ACTIVITY PAGES

 
       
         
         
 
 

20-MINUTE LESSON

CLICK TO PRINT "20-MINUTE" LESSON NOTES

 

1. Sing: Children’s Songbook #78 “I’m Trying to Be like Jesus.”

2. Read: Matthew 5:9

“Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God.”

3. Watch: chapter 12–13 from The Complete Learning System Pocahontas DVD.

4. What does it mean to be “Blessed”? (See Matt 4:9. Blessed means happy, favored, and glorified.)

5. What is a peacemaker? (A person who brings about or promotes peace.)

6. What is the promise the Savior gave associated with Peacemakers? (“...for they shall be called the children of God.” (3 Nephi 12:9, Matthew 4:9).

President Henry B. Eyring taught, “The Savior said, ‘And blessed are all the peacemakers, for they shall be called the children of God.” (3 Nephi 12:9). When I read that as a boy, I wondered about the promise. It didn’t sound like anything very glorious. But I see now that the promise is both glorious and sure. Those who will have eternal life are the children of God.” Henry B. Eyring, Friend, Jul 2009 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

7. We are all God’s children, but to be called “the children of God” means that you are trying to be like Heavenly Father and Jesus Christ who is the “Prince of Peace.” ( See Isaiah 9:6.) Every time we are loving or kind or forgiving or helpful, we are doing the things that Heavenly Father does and are becoming more like Him

8. Do you think Pocahontas was a peacemaker? (Discuss thoughts.)

“Except for the raw courage of Native American princess, Pocahontas, the English settlers at Jamestown in
the early 17th century would have died from starvation and exposure. Her brave intervention saved the settlers’ lives and brought peace between two very different peoples.” (Excerpt from Animated Hero Classics Pocahontas packaging.)

9. Do we need peacemakers, like Pocahontas, in the world today? (Discuss thoughts.)

“Because of the long history of hostility upon the earth, many feel that peace is beyond hope. I disagree. We can learn to love our fellow human beings throughout the world. Whether they be Jewish, Islamic, or fellow Christians, whether Hindu, Buddhist, or other, we can live together with mutual admiration and respect, without forsaking our religious convictions.” Russell M. Nelson, Ensign, Nov 2002 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

10. What can we do to follow the Savior’s admonition to be peacemakers in our home?
(Discuss ideas.)

“Certainly in our homes, as well as elsewhere, we can all be peacemakers by exhibiting love and goodwill, thus offsetting the evil of contention, envy, and jealousy. Where misunderstandings exist between children and parents we can encourage adjustments on the part of both. We can pray together for the spirit of peace.” Franklin D. Richards, Ensign, Nov 1983 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

11. Quote: “If we follow the example of Jesus Christ and become true peacemakers, that flood of love will cover the earth as with a blanket.” Theodore M. Burton, Ensign, Nov 1974 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All
rights reserved.