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“Can't Stop Trying”

INDEX:

 

Every family member will benefit from discussing ways to improve, through persistence, hard work and seeking inspiration.

The Wright Brothers provide a fun example of persistence by making the first powered airplane. And you will too, as you make planes out of not only paper, but also tasty ginger bread!

 

SONG

SCRIPTURE

VIDEO CLIP


LESSON SUMMARY

POINTS TO PONDER

 

STORY

TREAT
TIME

ACTIVITY

ACTIVITY PAGES

MUSIC MP3

 

VIDEO CLIP:
The Animated Hero Classics The Wright Brothers ch. 10
(click on above for full screen)

PRINCIPLE:
Persistence

 

 

PRINT THIS ENTIRE LESSON

 

20-MINUTE LESSON

   

SONG

 
 

Children’s Songbook #167 “Go the Second Mile” verse #1–2.

 

If you wish to print sheet music or have an online music file to accompany you click on the song link to visit: http://www.lds.org/cm

SCRIPTURE

Alma 32:43

 

43. Then, my brethren, ye shall reap the rewards of your faith, and your diligence, and patience, and long-suffering, waiting for the tree to bring forth fruit unto you.

 

 

VIDEO

Watch chapter 10 from the animated Complete Learning System, The Wright Brothers DVD or CLICK FOR CLIP

 

LESSON SUMMARY

 
 

For younger children, it may be helpful to summarize the following ideas:

 

Line upon line, precept upon precept.

“The Wright brothers committed themselves to do what no one else had ever done before. They took time to do their homework. They were humble and smart enough to appreciate and learn about the work of others who went before. And they tackled the problem line upon line, precept upon precept.”

Dieter F. Uchtdorf, Liahona, July 2006,© 2006 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

Going the second mile.

“We ought to use our talents to benefit man and in so doing, benefit God....We can do nothing better than to honor God and do it through our life and works. Choose to follow this course in life by going the second mile, and he will honor you. The great men and women in history have been those willing to go the second mile’ (Beverly Chiodo, Vital Speeches of the Day, 1 Nov. 1987, p. 42).”

Vaughn J. Featherstone, New Era, May 1990© 2006 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

Inspiration and guidance from the Spirit of the Lord.

“All intelligence comes from God, and anyone whose mind is opened to the development of inventions for the benefit and blessing of mankind receives that light and truth through study, through research, through inspiration and guidance from the Spirit of the Lord, whether that individual be a Morse, an Edison, an Alexander Graham Bell, an Orville or Wilbur Wright, or whoever he may be.”

Joseph Anderson, Ensign, Jan. 1973, © 2006 Intellectual Reserve, Inc.  All rights reserved.

 

Work diligently throughout life.

Like Orville and Wilbur Wright, Heber J. Grant worked diligently throughout his life, to improve himself. “He believed that ‘every individual can improve from day to day, from year to year, and have greater capacity to do things as the years come and the years go.’ He became known for his persistence, and it was said of him that ‘he never criticized other men’s weaknesses but made war on his own.’”

Bryant S. Hinckley, Heber J. Grant: Highlights in the Life of a Great Leader (1951), 50. © 2006 Intellectual Reserve, Inc.  All rights reserved.

 

POINTS TO PONDER

 
 

How can righteous persistence help us in our lives?

“Persistence in the pursuit of righteous desires can help us develop talents, attain our spiritual goals, and serve others.”

Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Heber J. Grant

 

Can persistence help us accomplish worthwhile goals?

Heber J. Grant said, “I believe that we can accomplish any object that we make up our minds to, and no boy or girl ought to sit down and say, because they cannot do as well as somebody else, that they will not do anything. God has given to some people ten talents; to others, he has given one; but they who improve the one talent will live to see the day when they will far outshine those who have ten talents but fail to improve them.”

Improvement Era, July 1901, 684–85, Improvement Era, July 1901, 684–85

 

“President Heber J. Grant often quoted the following statement, which is sometimes attributed to Ralph Waldo Emerson: “That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do–not that the nature of the thing is changed, but that our power to do is increased.’”

Gospel Standards, 355. © 2006 Intellectual Reserve, Inc.  All rights reserved.

Does it take persistence to stay on the path that leads to eternal life?

“ It requires a constant effort on the part of each and every one of us to make a success of our lives. It requires no effort at all to roll down the hill, but it does require an effort to climb the hill to the summit. It needs no effort to walk in the broad way that leads to destruction; but it needs an effort to keep in the straight and narrow path that leads to life eternal.”

Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Heber J. Grant, 4 © 2006 Intellectual Reserve, Inc.  All rights reserved.

 

Do you think that Orville and Wilbur sought the Lord’s help while inventing the first successful airplane?

Orville and Wilbur Wright’s parents encouraged religion, family values and education.

 

Why do you think the Lord helped and continues to help inventors like Orville and Wilbur Wright?

“100 years ago, people still traveled by horse and buggy...There has been an explosion of secular knowledge. I believe that God has opened up these treasures of intelligence to enhance His purposes on the earth.... Advances in travel and communication have helped the institutional Church move forward at a rapid pace in proclaiming the gospel.”

James E. Faust, Ensign, May 1999 © 2006 Intellectual Reserve, Inc.  All rights reserved.

 

 

Quotes:

“I know of no easy formula to success. Persist, persist, PERSIST; work, work, WORK—is what counts in the battle of life.”

Heber J. Grant

 

“Genius is only the power of making continuous efforts. The line between failure and success is so fine that we scarcely know when we pass it; so fine that we are often on the line and do not know it. How many a man has thrown up his hands at a time when a little more effort, a little more patience would have achieved success? A little more persistence, a little more effort, and what seemed a hopeless failure may turn into a glorious success.”

Author unknown

 
 

STORY

 

 

1st Lt. Justin Bently looked back on his childhood, remembering the first time he expressed the desire to become a pilot.

“What do you want to be when you’re grown?” Father had asked the children during an F.H.E. lesson.

“I’m gonna fwy airpwanes, just like Gwampa!” answered three-year-old Justin.

Justin was jolted back from his thoughts by the boom of the Brigadier General’s voice in the adjacent room as he addressed this years new class of cadets, “You know how tough it was to get into the Academy; well it’s even tougher to make it through to graduation, but I promise you it is worth every bit of the effort.”

Justin knew that the new cadets were feeling a roller coaster of emotions—excitement, pride, fear, panic, and everything in between. It had been extremely tough to make it to graduation and Justin had relied heavily on the Lord for guidance and strength to make it through.

“While you are attending this academy you will be expected to show character. This academy defines character as ‘Qualities of moral excellence which compel a person to do the right things despite pressure or temptations to the contrary,’” the Brigadier General continued.

Justin was thankful that he had been brought up in a home that expected this same code of character. Many of his classmates hadn’t made it to graduation because of their lack of character.

Drifting back again to his childhood, Justin remembered his Father’s counsel, “Grandpa would be proud to have you follow in his footsteps. It won’t be easy to become an Air Force pilot. It takes hard work and you will have to learn to be persistent, but with Heavenly Father’s help you can reach that goal.”

After the lunch break, Justin had the opportunity to address the new cadets. “I’m Lt. Justin Bently. I’m from North Carolina. My first inclination to be a pilot was when I was three years old and my Grandfather took me to the Wright Brothers Memorial museum. After that all I wanted to do was fly.

The eager cadets applauded loudly.

Page 2

   
 

“I’m sure many of you have dreamed of becoming an Air Force pilot since you were knee high to a bug’s eye as well. I’m here to tell you that today that dream begins to become a reality!”

Justin continued, “My parents taught me at a young age to set goals and be persistent in reaching them. My Father would say, ‘Justin, when you fall down you get back up. When you’re pushed back, you push forward even harder. When you feel like something is beyond your grasp, you need to reach further.’ I know you all have been persistent in reaching your goals or you wouldn’t be here today.

Again the room was filled with applause.

“As a cadet at this academy you all are in for an experience found nowhere else. You will learn things you won’t find in any classroom. You’ll learn how to push yourself to the limits. You’ll develop your strength and character as a human being. You’ll discover what you’re made of.”

Justin’s voice boomed with enthusiasm, “If you are persistent and work hard, I promise you will learn the skills you need to succeed as an officer in the United States Air Force. So take my Daddy’s advice and be persistent in all that you do that is worthwhile!”

 

by Margie Nauta Lee © Living Scriptures Inc. 2006

 

TREAT TIME

CLICK TO PRINT “Ginger Bread Planes” recipe

Ginger Bread Planes

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Directions:

Bring the honey to a boil. Keeping the pan over very low heat, add the spices. Add the food coloring. Then begin to slowly stir in the bread crumbs. Add just enough bread to achieve a thick, stiff, well-blended mass (you may not use all of the bread crumbs). Remove from the heat and turn the mixture into a container or bowl to cool.

 

Treat Time:

Divide the edible playdough-like mixture into enough pieces for each member of your family. Have each family member invent (mold) their own edible airplane.

 

Ingredients

  • 1/2 lb. honey
  • 1/2 lb. bread crumbs finely ground (either white or wheat, or a combination. Be sure that they are dry and not soft in any way).
  • 2 tsp. Ginger
  • 1 tsp. Cinnamon
  • 3 drops red food coloring
 

ACTIVITY

 

 


Activity: Younger children will need help from an older sibling or parent.

 

1. Divide the family into groups.

2. Explain that there were many inventors throughout history that tried to invent the first powered airplane.

Ask: What characteristics do you think the Wright Brothers possessed that allowed them to invent the first powered airplane? (Persistence, faith, talent, determination, hard working, ambition, prayer, etc....)

3. Ask each group to pretend that they are inventors in the early 1900s who have seen a vision of the first powered airplane (show picture of “The First Powered Airplane” model) and they are going to try to build it.

4. Give each group their parts. Ask the following questions:

A. What would be the first thing you would do before you tried to build an airplane? (Pray for guidance.)

B. Do you think that Heavenly Father told Orville and Wilbur Wright exactly how to build the airplane? (No. He gave them guidance, but they had to be persistent, and work hard and through trial and error they were able to perfect it.)

C. Do you think they had to pray more than once? (Yes. Many times.)

D. Can you build this airplane without any help? (No. We need directions.)

5. Give each group the first page of directions and explain that if they need more directions they can ask you for more direction, but they also have to be innovative and persistent, because the directions do not show exactly how to build the plane. (Give another sheet of directions each time they ask for more. Remind them to look at the picture for help and that each group’s plane might be a little different as they come up with their own way to build it.)

6. After they are done talk about their feelings while building. (Frustrated, excited, discouraged, happy, etc...)

7. Talk about and encourage your family that no matter what they are righteously doing to remember to pray for guidance, be persistent and never give up.

 

Preparation:

1. Print out the artwork for each group.

2. Cut out each part and place in a pile for each group.

What you need:

A copy of “The First Powered Airplane” model pattern and directions (artwork included with this lesson), scissors, and glue and or tape.

 

ACTIVITY PAGES

 
       
         
         

MUSIC MP3

 

 

20-MINUTE LESSON

CLICK TO PRINT "20-MINUTE" LESSON NOTES

 

1. Watch chapter 10 from the animated Complete Learning System, The Wright Brothers DVD. (Video clip is also provided for viewing online.)

2. Do you think that Orville and Wilbur sought the Lord’s help while inventing the first successful airplane?

Orville and Wilbur Wright’s parents encouraged religion, family values and education.

3. Do you think Orville and Wilbur had to pray more than once? (Yes. Many times.)

4. After seeking the Lord’s help with our problems, what else do we need to do?

“The Wright brothers committed themselves to do what no one else had ever done before. They took time to do their homework. They were humble and smart enough to appreciate and learn about the work of others who went before. And they tackled the problem line upon line, precept upon precept.” Dieter F. Uchtdorf, Liahona, July 2006, © 2006 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

5. Did Orville and Wilbur Wright show diligence and patience while trying to invent the first successful airplane?

“Then, my brethren, ye shall reap the rewards of your faith, and your diligence, and patience, and long-suffering, waiting for the tree to bring forth fruit unto you.” (Alma 32:43)

6. What characteristics do you think the Wright Brothers possessed that allowed them to invent the first powered airplane? (Persistence, faith, talent, determination, hard working, ambition, prayer, etc...)

7. Do you think that Heavenly Father told Orville and Wilbur Wright exactly how to build their airplane? (No. He gave them guidance, but they had to be persistent, and work hard and through trial and error they were able to perfect it.)

8. Why do you think the Lord helped and continues to help inventors like Orville and Wilbur Wright?

“100 years ago, people still traveled by horse and buggy...There has been an explosion of secular knowledge. I believe that God has opened up these treasures of intelligence to enhance His purposes on the earth.... Advances in travel and communication have helped the institutional Church move forward at a rapid pace in proclaiming the gospel.” James E. Faust, Ensign, May 1999 © 2006 Intellectual Reserve, Inc.  All rights reserved.

Quotes: “I know of no easy formula to success. Persist, persist, PERSIST; work, work, WORK—is what counts in the battle of life.”—Heber J. Grant

“Genius is only the power of making continuous efforts. The line between failure and success is so fine that we scarcely know when we pass it; so fine that we are often on the line and do not know it. How many a man has thrown up his hands at a time when a little more effort, a little more patience would have achieved success? A little more persistence, a little more effort, and what seemed a hopeless failure may turn into a glorious success.” Author unknown