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“The Privilege of Worshiping”

INDEX:

 

The video clip from Maccabees and the lesson will help your children understand what it means to have the freedom to worship God as we choose, while the activity, story and fun treat emphasizes the importance of using our opportunities to vote even when we are young in order to maintain our freedoms.

 

SONG

SCRIPTURE

VIDEO CLIP


LESSON SUMMARY

POINTS TO PONDER

 

STORY

TREAT
TIME

ACTIVITY

ACTIVITY PAGES

 

VIDEO CLIP:
The Animated Hero Classics
Maccabees: The Story of Hanukkah ch 5
(click on above for full screen)

PRINCIPLE:
Religious Freedom

Free Agency


 

PRINT THIS ENTIRE LESSON

 

20-MINUTE LESSON

SONG

 
 

Children's Songbook #130 "The Eleventh Article of Faith."

 

If you wish to print sheet music or have an online music file to accompany you click on the song link to visit: http://www.lds.org/cm

SCRIPTURE

The Articles Of Faith 1:11

 

11. We claim the privilege of worshiping Almighty God according to the dictates of our own conscience, and allow all men the same privilege,
let them worship how, where, or what they may.

VIDEO

Watch chapter 5 from the animated Complete Learning System, Maccabees: The Story of Hanukkah DVD or CLICK FOR CLIP

 

LESSON SUMMARY

 
 

What does it mean to worship God according to the dictates of our own conscience? (Discuss ideas.)

“The 11th Article of Faith of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is a framework for religious freedom for all churches. ... Though we may profess different creeds and worship in different manners and places, we respect each others humanity and expression of faith.”
W. Cole Durham Jr, 2009 annual banquet of the First Freedom Center.

Did King Antiochus give the people of Israel the privilege of worshiping God according to the dictates of [their] own conscience,” (A of F 1:11.)? (No.)

What were the people of Israel threatened with if they refused to worship the Greek gods? (Death.)

What did the people of Israel do? (Discuss ideas. Emphasize that some of the people obeyed King Antiochus, but the Maccabees stayed true to their faith.)

Unlike the people of Israel during King Antiochus’ rule, citizens of the United States are guaranteed religious freedom. The U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.”

Are there people today who are threatening to take away our religious freedom? (Discuss ideas.)

Religious freedom continues to be at risk. Even today, leaders in many nations use their power to keep their people from worshiping how they please.

Elder M. Russell Ballard said, “Our government is succumbing to pressure to distance itself from God and religion. A simple constitutional prohibition of state-sponsored church has evolved into court-ordered bans against representations of the Ten Commandments on government buildings, Christmas manger scenes on public property, and prayer at public meetings. ...There are many who are actively seeking a total exclusion of the mention of God in the public square.” Ensign, Oct 1992 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

POINTS TO PONDER

 
 

What did the Maccabees do to regain their religious freedom? (Discuss ideas.)

What can we do to ensure our religious freedom? (Discuss ideas.)

“Elder Dallin H. Oaks said religious freedom is being threatened by societal forces intimidating those with religious points of view from having a voice in the public square. ... He said that members of the Church should not be deterred or coerced into silence by threats, ‘We must insist on our constitutional right and duty to exercise our religion, to vote our consciences on public issues, and to participate in elections and debates in the public square and the halls of justice.’ (Dallin H. Oaks, Speech given at BYU-Idaho, Oct 2009)” Newsroom © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

How can we as Latter-day Saints let those of other religions know that we uphold their right to worship how they please? (Discuss ideas.)

“‘Allow all men the same privilege’ expresses, of course, the idea of religious tolerance and I like to think that this is a gospel principle that can be extended to include tolerance in all its forms... There are no divisive differences between us, we know who we are, all of us. ... Truth demands our allegiance, but it should not be a barrier to tolerance and compassion and love. ... Moreover, having truth in our possession, knowing righteous and true principles, doesn’t automatically make a Latter-day Saint better or more righteous than others, but it is living what we know, not knowing alone, that is really important.” Ann N. Madsen, New Era, Oct 1983 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

Quotes:

“We recognize the good in all people. We recognize the good in all churches, in their efforts to improve mankind and to teach principles that lead to good, stable, productive living. To people everywhere we simply say, ‘You bring with you all the good that you have, and let us add to it. That is the principle on which we work.’” Gordon B. Hinckley, interview with Philippines Television, 30 April 1996 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

“We believe that the Church should remain out of politics unless there is a moral question at issue. In the case of a moral issue we would expect to speak out on our view, but, in the matter of everyday political considerations, we try to remain aloof from those as a Church, while at the same time urging our members, as citizens, to exercise their political franchise as individuals. And we believe, likewise, that it is in the interest of good government to permit freedom of worship, freedom of religion.” Gordon B. Hinckley, press conference, Tokyo, Japan, 18 May 1996 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

STORY

Who Will Make the Best Class President?

 

Katie sat reverently with anticipation as she watched the General Authorities walk across the stand and take their seats. “There he is, Quinn,” she whispered to her little brother. “There’s the Prophet.”

As the choir sang, “Know This, That Every Soul is Free,” Katie thought about the people of Israel and how King Antiochus had tried to force them to worship idols.

I am so glad that I’m free to worship how I please or I wouldn’t even get to be here to see the Prophet.

After the song, President Eyring stood for the sustaining of the Church leaders. Katie remembered what Daddy had taught them in Family Home Evening. “When you sustain someone in church you are voting to support the person the Lord has chosen for that calling.”

President Eyring spoke clearly into the microphone, “It is proposed that we sustain Thomas Spencer Monson as prophet, seer, and revelator and President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; Henry Bennion Eyring as First Counselor in the First Presidency; and Dieter Friedrich Uchtdorf as Second Counselor in the First Presidency. Those in favor may manifest it.”

Katie exuberantly raised her hand, casting her vote of support for God’s chosen.

***

Kristin sat on the school house steps next to Katie while she tied her shoe. “I think you should run for class president,” Kristin urged Katie.

“Not me, I’m not a good leader,” Katie said. “I couldn’t even decide if I wanted my Mom to make me a peanut butter and jelly sandwich or a peanut butter and honey sandwich for lunch.” Katie giggled, “So I had her make both and give me a half of each.”

“You know who will run?” Kristin whispered, “Madison. She’s a born leader. Look at all those girls following her around the playground.”

“And Kevin or maybe Zach,” Katie added. “They’re both popular, too.” Katie then jumped to her feet and raced after Madison and the other girls. “Come on, Kristin,” she prodded, “You know what they say, ‘If you can’t beat them. Join them.’”

***

Mrs. Martin’s sixth grade class stood in a single file while waiting their turn to enter the voting both.

“It’s your turn, Katie,” Mrs. Martin prompted.

Katie looked down at her feet, willing them to step into the booth. “I’m sorry, Mrs. Martin. I don’t know who to vote for,” she confessed. “I like both of the candidates.”

It’s not like voting to support President Monson. I knew in my heart that he is chosen by God.

Mrs. Martin motioned for her class aide to come take her place handing out the blank ballots to the children. “I understand your apprehension, Katie. Voting is a very important obligation. But, liking and choosing which candidate would make the best class president are two different things. I won’t tell you who to vote for, but maybe I can help you decide who will make the best class president.”

Mrs. Martin lead Katie to the back of the classroom where they sat down at the reading table. She took a piece of paper and drew lines down it to form three columns. She wrote “Qualifications” in the first column and “Kevin” and “Madison” in the other two columns.

Before going back to her place at the voting booth she handed Katie the paper. “Write the qualifications you think a good class president needs to possess,” Mrs. Martin instructed. “Then put an ‘X’ next to the name of the candidate you believe better exemplifies each quality. When you’re done, add up the ‘X’s’. The candidate who has the most is the person you should vote for.”

Katie thought for a minute. “Hmm. What makes a good class president?” she thought. “Smart? Yes. Organized? Yes. Cute? No. Good leader? Yes. Good ball player? No. ....” Katie finally had her list.

The first qualification she had written down was “Smart.” Katie put an “x” under both names, “Ugh. This isn’t helping. Madison and Kevin are both straight ‘A’ students.” But as Katie went down the list she realized that Madison was better at some things and Kevin was better at others. When she was all done, she counted the “x’s” under each name.

“Wow, it’s really, really close,” she said to herself, “but I now know who to vote for!”

Katie paused after she got up from the table. Mrs. Martin said a secret ballot lets you vote your conscience without being pressured by those around you with different opinions and values. Katie quietly tore her list up and threw it in the garbage so no one would see it before getting back in line to vote.

After Mrs. Martin handed Katie a blank ballot, she ducked inside the voting booth. Without any doubts Katie punched the pin through the hole next to her choice for class president.

by Margie Nauta Lee © Living Scriptures, Inc.

 

TREAT TIME

CLICK TO PRINT “Petite Star Cake" recipe

 

"Petite Star Cakes"

(Petite Fours)

Bake Time: 20 minutes

Cool Time: 30 minutes

Prep Time: 90 minutes

Directions:

Cake: In a large bowl mix eggs and sugar on high for 7 minutes. On low speed beat in flour, baking powder, salt and extract. Pour batter into a prepared jelly-roll pan. Bake for 20 minutes. Cool for 10 minutes and then remove from pan. Cool completely. Cut star shapes out of cake with a star shaped cookie cutter.

Icing: Mix together all of the ingredients. Heat the mixture in microwave for 60 seconds. Stir. Place bowl on top of another bowl filled with hot water to keep warm. Dip sides of cakes in icing. Place on wire rack and pour small amount on top to coat. Let set until icing dries.

Fondant: In a large bowl, stir together the shortening, corn syrup, salt and almond flavoring. Gradually mix in the powdered sugar until it becomes a stiff dough. Knead for 30 seconds. If the dough is sticky, knead in more powdered sugar until it is smooth. Divide into thirds. Leave one white, color one blue and one red. Roll out 1/8 inch thick on a clean surface, dusted with powdered sugar.

Treat Time: Give each family member a star to decorate. For each cake, using the same cookie cutter you cut cake with, cut a star out of each color of fondant. Place stars on top of each other with white on top to prevent the other colors from bleeding onto the white. With a sharp knife follow pattern to cut out. Gently press the pieces you need onto your cakes. Put the unused pieces back to be used again.
Cut three small stars out of the white fondant and gently press onto the blue.

Cake Ingredients:

  • 4 large eggs
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1-1/4 cups flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp almond extract

     

Fondant Icing:

  • 1/4 cup light corn syrup
  • 1/4 cup shortening
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp almond extract
  • 1 3/4–2 cups powdered sugar
  • Red & blue gel food coloring

Icing Ingredients:

  • 4-1/2 cups powdered sugar
  • 1/2 tsp almond extract
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/4 cup light corn syrup
 

ACTIVITY

 

 


 

 

Activity: Younger children will need help from an older sibling or parent.

1. Explain: The people of Israel during the time of King Antiochus didn’t have freedom of religion nor the opportunity to vote for good leaders. There are countries still today that do not allow their citizens these privileges. Church leaders have encouraged us to be good citizens and to strengthen our communities and nations where ever we live. There are many ways to be good citizens. These include participating in government or political processes, obeying the law, and serving in our neighborhoods and communities. It is essential that in countries where citizens have the opportunity to vote that they do so.

2. Ask: Why is it important to vote? (“Guarantees of political freedom maintain their force only if citizens are willing to exercise that freedom in their own behalf.” Cheryll Lynn May, Ensign, Jun 1976 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

3. Ask: How old do you need to be to vote in the United States?
(U.S. Constitution Amendment 26 - 1. The right of citizens of the United States, who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of age.)

4. Explain: Even though children are not old enough to vote in government elections there are other places where they have the opportunity to vote. Children can vote by the uplifted hand to sustain someone in a church position as a sign of our personal commitment to uphold the Lord’s choice of that person in that calling. When we say “amen” at the end of a group prayer we are giving your vote of agreement. In school children may have the opportunity to vote for school or class officers. Parents should also give their children opportunities to vote on family matters, such as what to have for dinner, where to go on vacation, what service project to do as a family, etc. These opportunities to vote will help prepare them for voting in the future to help ensure our freedom of religion.

5. Hold an election using the provided ballot or make your own ballot. Before voting help your children to be informed voters by discussing the issues.

6. Give each family member a “I Voted” sticker. Tally ballots and discuss the results.

 

What you need:

A copy of the “Family Voting” activity (artwork included with this lesson) for each child, a nail, glue, tape, paper, a tissue or shoe box, a rope and a sheet.

 

Preparation:

1. Print out the artwork. Cut out stickers.
2. Cover box with paper. Decorate w/extra stickers. Cut a slit in the top to make a ballot box.
3. Tape the rope across a hall or doorway. Drape sheet over rope to make a voting booth.

 
 

ACTIVITY PAGES

 
       
         
         
   
 

20-MINUTE LESSON

CLICK TO PRINT "20-MINUTE" LESSON NOTES

 

1. Sing: Children’s Songbook #130, “The Eleventh Article of Faith.”

2. Watch: chapter 5 from the animated Complete Learning System Maccabees: The Story of Hanukkah DVD. (Video clip is also provided for viewing online.)

3. What does it mean to worship God according to the dictates of our own conscience? (Discuss ideas.)

“The 11th Article of Faith of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is a framework for religious freedom for all churches. ... Though we may profess different creeds and worship in different manners and places, we respect each others humanity and expression of faith.” W. Cole Durham Jr, 2009 annual banquet of the First Freedom Center.

4. Did King Antiochus give the people of Israel the privilege of worshiping God according to the dictates of [their] own conscience,” (A of F 1:11.)? (No.)

5. What did the people of Israel do? (Discuss ideas. Emphasize that some of the people obeyed King Antiochus, but the Maccabees stayed true to their faith.)

Unlike the people of Israel during King Antiochus’ rule, citizens of the United States are guaranteed religious freedom. The U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an
establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.”

6. Are there people today who are threatening to take away our religious freedom? (Discuss ideas.)

Religious freedom continues to be at risk. Even today, leaders in many nations use their power to keep their people from worshiping how they please. Elder M. Russell Ballard said, “Our government is succumbing to pressure to distance itself from God and religion. A simple constitutional prohibition of state-sponsored church has evolved into court-ordered bans against representations of the Ten Commandments on government buildings, Christmas manger scenes on public property, and prayer at public meetings. ...There are many who are actively seeking a total exclusion of the mention of God in the public square.” Ensign, Oct 1992 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

7. What can we do to ensure our religious freedom? (Discuss ideas.)

“Elder Dallin H. Oaks said religious freedom is being threatened by societal forces intimidating those with religious points of view from having a voice in the public square. ... He said that members of the Church should not be deterred or coerced into silence by threats, ‘We must insist on our constitutional right and duty
to exercise our religion, to vote our consciences on public issues, and to participate in elections and debates in the public square and the halls of justice.’ (Dallin H. Oaks, Speech given at BYU-Idaho, Oct 2009)” Newsroom © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

8. How can we as Latter-day Saints let those of other religions know that we uphold their right to worship how they please? (Discuss ideas.)

“‘Allow all men the same privilege’ expresses, of course, the idea of religious tolerance and I like to think that this is a gospel principle that can be extended to include tolerance in all its forms... There are no divisive differences between us, we know who we are, all of us. ... Truth demands our allegiance, but it should not be a barrier to tolerance and compassion and love. ... Moreover, having truth in our possession, knowing righteous and true principles, doesn’t automatically make a Latter-day Saint better or more righteous than others, but it is living what we know, not knowing alone, that is really important.” Ann N. Madsen, New Era, Oct 1983 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

9. Quote: “We believe that the Church should remain out of politics unless there is a moral question at issue. In the case of a moral issue we would expect to speak out on our view, but, in the matter of everyday political considerations, we try to remain aloof from those as a Church, while at the same time urging our members, as citizens, to exercise their political franchise as individuals. And we believe, likewise, that it is in the interest of good government to permit freedom of worship, freedom of religion.” Gordon B. Hinckley, press conference, Tokyo, Japan, 18 May 1996 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.