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“Stand Up and Lead Out”

INDEX:

 

This lesson emphasizes what sacrifice and commitment meant for Joan of Arc and Joseph Smith. The, video clip, fun activity, story and treat help us to learn what it means for us to have allegiance to God and stand up for our beliefs.

 

SONG

SCRIPTURE

VIDEO CLIP


LESSON SUMMARY

POINTS TO PONDER

 

STORY

TREAT
TIME

ACTIVITY

ACTIVITY PAGES

 

VIDEO CLIP:
The Animated Stories from the Hero Classics: Joan of Arc Chapters 7-8

PRINCIPLES:
Commitment and Sacrifice


 

PRINT THIS ENTIRE LESSON

 

20-MINUTE LESSON

   

SONG

 
 

Children's Songbook #158 “Dare to Do Right” .

 

 

If you wish to print sheet music or have an online music file to accompany you click on the song link to visit: http://www.lds.org/churchmusic

SCRIPTURE

Ephesians 6:13–18

 

13. Wherefore take unto you the whole armour of God, that ye may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand.
14. Stand therefore, having your loins girt about with truth, and having on the breastplate of righteousness;
15. And your feet shod with the preparation of the gospel of peace;
16. Above all, taking the shield of faith, wherewith ye shall be able to quench all the fiery darts of the wicked.
17. And take the helmet of salvation, and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God:
18. Praying always with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit, and watching thereunto with all perseverance and supplication for all saints;

(See also Doctrine and Covenants 27:15–18)

 

VIDEO CLIP

Watch chapters7-8 from the Animated Complete Learning System, Joan of Arc DVD or CLICK FOR CLIP

 

LESSON SUMMARY

 
 

For younger children, it may be helpful to summarize the following ideas:

 

What choices did Joan of Arc make that showed her allegiance to God? (Discuss ideas.)

“As we learn of Joan of Arc, we are first of all impressed with her undying faith in the mission she believed she must fulfill. Her whole soul seemed to yearn towards God and
her country. At a tender age, she committed to stand up and lead out. ...When we consider God’s great love and sacrifice for us, we can declare our allegiance to him by the choices we make each day.” Ardeth G. Kapp, New Era, Nov 1985 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

What choices can we make each day that show our allegiance to God? (Discuss ideas.)

How was Joan of Arc different from the other girls her age? (Discuss ideas.)

When do we need to be different than those around us? (Discuss ideas.)

“Long before the gospel was restored, Joan had the Light of Christ and also the courage to follow its promptings and make a difference. To other girls in the fifteenth century, Joan of Arc seemed to be very different. Don’t be afraid to be different in our century! Sometimes we have to be different in order to maintain Church standards.” James E. Faust, Friend, May 2007© Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

Did Joan of Arc let the fear of death change her faith or beliefs? (Discuss ideas.)

“As the fires were being ignited around the stake to which she was tied, Joan was given a last chance to save her life and regain her liberty if she would deny her religious—and thus some of her personally motivated political—beliefs. She refused to deny anything she believed or anything she had said about her faith, and thus chose fire above freedom, and principle above politics.” Jeffrey R. Holland, New Era, Jan 2010 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

What fears might we face in standing up for our beliefs? (Discuss ideas.)

“Sometimes you may be teased or misunderstood because of your beliefs. You too can stand for righteousness. Perhaps the people who make fun of you now will one day see you as an example and show their respect for you. No matter what others may think, Heavenly Father is pleased when you are true to your standards and He will help you.” Wolfgang H. Paul, Liahona, Oct 2006 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

POINTS TO PONDER

 
 

What is a martyr? (Someone who chooses to die rather than deny or reject what they believe in.)

Joan of Arc had a great faith in God. She believed she had been chosen by God to lead the army of France in battles with England. The English soldiers were afraid of her. During the battle at Orleans, she was struck by an arrow. She pulled the arrow out and continued to lead.
News of her courage began to be told and sometimes people would just give up rather than face her in battle. The English captured her and put her in prison. They thought that if Joan was put to death that France would lose the war. She died a martyr when they put her to death by fire.

Did Joan’s enemies succeed in winning the war after Joan was put to death for not denying her beliefs? (Discuss ideas.)

“As the war continued, the upkeep and maintenance of the region proved too burdensome and the English crown was essentially bankrupted. ... At the end of the war, England was left an island nation.” From Wikipedia

What did the Prophet Joseph Smith and Joan of Arc have in common? (Discuss ideas.)

Many non–Latter-day Saints in Illinois were afraid of the potential economic and political power of so many members of the Church. They thought that if they got rid of Joseph Smith, the Church would fall apart. They began to persecute them. Joseph and his brother Hyrum were falsely accused of rioting and treason. Joseph Smith would not deny his faith and the things he knew to be true even when they were facing death. While in the Carthage Jail, Joseph and Hyrum died as martyrs at the hands of an angry mob.

What can we learn from Joan of Arc and the Prophet Joseph Smith? (Discuss ideas.)

We do not have to be martyrs to be like the Prophet Joseph Smith and Joan of Arc. President Gordon B. Hinckley said, “We must stand firm in our beliefs. If we do so, the Almighty will be our strength and our protector, our guide and our revelator. We shall have the comfort of knowing that we are doing what He would have us do.” Gordon B. Hinckley, Liahona, Nov 2003 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

Quote: “I would rather die than do something which I know to be a sin, or to be against God’s will.” ~Joan of Arc

 

STORY

 

 

Kayla looked at her reflection in the mirror as she rehearsed her lines for the school play. “I would rather die than do something which I know to be a sin, or … or …” Quickly glancing down at the open script lying on the dresser, she scanned the page, “…or to be against God’s will.”

Plopping down on her bed, Kayla closed her eyes and repeated the forgotten line to commit it to memory, “or to be against God’s will…or to be against God’s will…or to be against God’s will.”

Kayla’s mind drifted from her task as she daydreamed of herself in Joan of Arc’s place, bound to a stake, as flames threateningly danced around her. How could she do it? How could she just let them burn her at the stake like that? If I was really Joan of Arc, could I do it? she wondered.

***

After dinner Kayla rehearsed her lines again. “That was perfect!” Mother announced.

“Yes!” Kayla exclaimed. “I’m ready.”

“Except for one little detail,” Mother teased.

“What?” Kayla asked despairingly.

“Your costume! I need you to try it on so I can finish it.”

Mother gently pulled Kayla’s blond waist length hair out from beneath the costumes collar.

“What am I going to do about my hair?” she asked. “Joan of Arc cut her hair. I just couldn’t cut my hair.”

“I’ve got an idea,” Mother said.

Kayla watched in the mirror as Mother rolled the sides of her hair under, secured it with an elastic and then tucked the long pony tail beneath the big collar.

A big smile stole across her face, “It worked! I won’t have to cut my hair.”

Mother put her arms around Kayla’s shoulders and peered into the mirror. “You’re going to be a great Joan of Arc,” she said.

Kayla’s smile turned into a frown as a stray tear rolled down her cheek. “I wouldn’t really be a good
Joan of Arc,” she confessed. “I don’t even have the courage to sacrifice my hair,” she said with a huff.

“Oh, Kayla!” Mother said giving her a squeeze. “You don’t need to cut your hair for a school play to show your commitment to Heavenly Father.”

Mother handed Kayla the banner that Father had made for a prop. “Your battle standard is just as important as Joan’s was. Do you know what an amazing young woman you are? Your abilities as a leader of the standard of the restored Gospel among your peers
shows commitment and sacrifice every day.”

Kayla looked puzzled. “What sacrifices have I made?”

“Well, Tuesday you watched the Talbot’s baby for free so they could go to the temple. And just last week you chose not to go bowling with your friends on the Sabbath.”

“You can’t call those sacrifices,” Kayla said humbly. “I like tending Josh even if I don’t get paid, but it did sorta hurt when all my friends could talk about at lunch on Monday was how much fun they had without me. Still that’s nothing!” Kayla said, lifting the banner in the air and placing the pole back down on the ground with a loud bang. “Joan gave her life! That’s the greatest sacrifice anyone can make. Isn’t it?”

“We don’t all need to be martyrs, Kayla, to show our devotion to God! But, we all can give of what our lives are made up of—our time, our talents and our means, to bless the lives of others.”

by Margie Nauta Lee © 2008 Living Scriptures, Inc.

 

TREAT TIME

CLICK TO PRINT Coconut Battle Standard Treats” recipe

Coconut Battle Standard Treats

Prep Time:2 minutes

Cook Time: 5-6 minutes

Chill Time: 30-45 minutes

 

Directions:

  1. Combine the COCONUT MILK and sugar in an appropriately sized saucepan and bring to a boil over
    medium heat.
  2. Combine regular milk and starch separately then mix slowly into the hot pot. Continue to cook over medium heat, stirring constantly until very thick.
  3. Pour immediately into an 12” x 14” inch pan and chill until firm. Note: Use canned coconut milk (not coconut creme) usually found in the Asian section of grocery store or make your own fresh by blending fresh coconut meat in a blender with 1-1/2 cups hot water. Let set for 15 minutes and then strain through cheesecloth, squeezing out all of the liquid)

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups canned coconut milk
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/3 cup cornstarch
  • 1/4 tsp. vanilla
  • 1 chocolate licorice stick per banner

 

Treat Time:

Cut into banner shapes using the guide. With rubber spatula, carefully lift out of pan.

Press chocolate licorice stick into side to make the banner pole.

“I asked my Lord’s messengers what I should do. And they answered me, saying, Take up the
banner of your Lord. And thereupon I had a banner made.” ~Joan of Arc

Closing Prayer and blessing on the food.

 
 

ACTIVITY

 

Younger children will need help from an older sibling or parent.

 

Activity: YoYounger children will need help from an older sibling or

1. Explain: In 1429, Joan of Arc
commissioned a painter to design a large
banner to be used in battle. The banner was
called Joan’s battle standard. It was made
from a material called Buckram, similar to
an artist’s canvas with a silken fringe and
was adorned with a field of fleur de lys
(flower of the lily). It measured 3 feet high by 12 feet long.

2. Ask: What was the purpose of Joan’s battle standard? (The purpose of Joan’s battle standard was to indicate her location when her troops were scattered during battle and rally them to victory. Joan said “I loved my banner forty times better than my sword.” In Her Own Words, pg.26.)

3. Read: “Clad in a suit of white armor and flying her own standard, Joan of Arc liberated the besieged city of Orleans in 1429 and defeated the English in four other battles. ... She was imprisoned, tried as a heretic, and then burned at the stake in 1431. ... She [Joan of Arc] was courageous enough to follow the personal inspiration to which all of us are entitled. Although this is a sad ending, it does not take away from Joan’s greatness.” James E. Faust, Liahona, May 2006.

4. Ask: What is another meaning for the word “Standard”? (Principles of conduct informed by notions of honor and decency.)

5. Ask: Why is it important to maintain church standards? (Discuss ideas.)

6. Read: “ The standard, established by revelation, is contained in the scriptures through the doctrines of the gospel of Jesus Christ. ... We are bound to the standards by covenant, as administered through the ordinances of the gospel by those who have received priesthood and the keys of authority.” Boyd K. Packer, Liahona, Nov 2006.

7. Make a “Family Standard” by decorating (see sample for ideas) with principles that will help give your family the courage to rally to victory over the battle against Satan.

 

What you need:

A copy of the “Battle Standard” activity (artwork included with this lesson), colored markers, scissors, glue or tape and wooden dowel or stick.

 

Preparation:

  1. Print out artwork
  2. Cut along dotted lines.
  3. Tape panels together.

 

 

 
 

ACTIVITY PAGES

 
     
 

 

 

   
 
 

20-MINUTE LESSON

CLICK TO PRINT "20-MINUTE" LESSON NOTES

 

1. Sing: Children’s Songbook #158 “Dare to Do Right.”

2. Watch: Chapters 7-8 from animated Complete Learning System, Joan of Arc DVD. (Video clip is also
provided for viewing online.)

3. Read: Ephesians 6:13–17
“Wherefore take unto you the whole armour of God, that ye may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand. Stand therefore, having your loins girt about with truth, and having on the breastplate of righteousness; And your feet shod with the preparation of the gospel of peace; Above all, taking the shield of faith, wherewith ye shall be able to quench all the fiery darts of the wicked. And take the helmet of salvation, and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God:”

4. What choices did Joan of Arc make that showed her allegiance to God? (Discuss ideas.)

“As we learn of Joan of Arc, we are first of all impressed with her undying faith in the mission she believed she must fulfill. Her whole soul seemed to yearn towards God and her country. At a tender age, she committed to stand up and lead out. ...When we consider God’s great love and sacrifice for us, we can declare our allegiance to him by the choices we make each day.” Ardeth G. Kapp, New Era, Nov 1985 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

5. Did Joan of Arc let the fear of death change her faith or beliefs? (Discuss ideas.)

“As the fires were being ignited around the stake to which she was tied, Joan was given a last chance to save her life and regain her liberty if she would deny her religious—and thus some of her personally motivated political—beliefs. She refused to deny anything she believed or anything she had said about her faith, and thus chose fire above freedom, and principle above politics.” Jeffrey R. Holland, New Era, Jan 2010 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

6. What fears might we face in standing up for our beliefs? (Discuss ideas.)

“Sometimes you may be teased or misunderstood because of your beliefs. You too can stand for righteousness. Perhaps the people who make fun of you now will one day see you as an example and show their respect for you. No matter what others may think, Heavenly Father is pleased when you are true to your standards and He will help you.” Wolfgang H. Paul, Liahona, Oct 2006 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

7. What did the Prophet Joseph Smith and Joan of Arc have in common? (Discuss ideas.)
Joan of Arc had a great faith in God. The English soldiers were afraid of her. They captured and put her in prison. They thought that if Joan was put to death that France would lose the war. She died a martyr when they put her to death by fire.

Many non–Latter-day Saints in Illinois were afraid of the potential economic and political power of so many members of the Church. They thought that if they got rid of Joseph Smith, the Church would fall apart. They began to persecute them. Joseph and his brother Hyrum were falsely accused of rioting and treason. Joseph Smith would not deny his faith and the things he knew to be true even when they were facing death. While in the Carthage Jail, Joseph and Hyrum died as martyrs at the hands of an angry mob.

8. What can we learn from Joan of Arc and the Prophet Joseph Smith? (Discuss ideas.)

We do not have to be martyrs to be like the Prophet Joseph Smith and Joan of Arc. President Gordon B. Hinckley said, “We must stand firm in our beliefs. If we do so, the Almighty will be our strength and our protector, our guide and our revelator. We shall have the comfort of knowing that we are doing what He would have us do.” Gordon B. Hinckley, Liahona, Nov 2003 © Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

9. Quote: “I would rather die than do something which I know to be a sin, or to be against God’s will.” Joan of Arc