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“Harriet Tubman: Woman of Faith and Courage”

INDEX:

 

Explore the Underground Railroad while learning about this great woman from history who had the faith and courage to follow God's plan and dared to do right. A story of a young boy will help your children find their own courage to dare to do right. Your whole family will be "all aboard?" when you make this authentic 1800's southern slave "Jumble Cake" recipe.

 

SONG

SCRIPTURE

VIDEO CLIP


LESSON SUMMARY

POINTS TO PONDER

 

STORY

TREAT
TIME

ACTIVITY

ACTIVITY PAGES

MUSIC MP3

 

VIDEO CLIP:
The Animated Hero Classics: Harriet Tubman ch. 13–14
(click on above for full screen)

PRINCIPLE:
Faith

Courage


 

PRINT THIS ENTIRE LESSON

 

20-MINUTE LESSON

   

SONG

 
 

Children’s Songbook #158 “Dare to Do Right” verse #1.

If you wish to print sheet music or have an online music file to accompany you click on the song link to visit: http://www.lds.org/cm

SCRIPTURE

Mosiah 8:18

 

18. Thus God has provided a means that man, through faith, might work mighty miracles; therefore he becometh a great benefit to his fellow beings.

 

VIDEO

Watch chapters 13–14 from the animated Complete Learning System, Harriet Tubman DVD or CLICK FOR CLIP

 

LESSON SUMMARY

 
 

For younger children, it may be helpful to summarize the following ideas:

Harriet Tubman, woman of faith and courage.
Harriet Tubman dared to do right and “...through faith, might work mighty miracles; therefore he [she] becometh a great benefit to his [her] fellow beings.” (Mosiah 8:18.) Despite great hardship and great danger Harriet Tubman courageously lead about 70 slaves to freedom, while her instructions also allowed about 70 more slaves independently find their freedom. Her example continues to inspire all who cherish freedom.
How can Harriet’s great example help us find joy in our daily lives? (Discuss ideas.)

Happiness comes from choosing the right.
If you have faith and courage to choose the right and help others every day, even when those around you choose differently, you will be happy and the Lord will bless you and give you strength to do great things.

Did the Lord help Harriet because she had great faith and courage, when those around her chose differently? (Yes.)

There were good people who helped Harriet Tubman in her work on the Underground Railroad, but there were many, many, others who didn’t have the faith and courage to help, even though they knew slavery was wrong. “It is not enough for us to know what is right and to believe it is good. We must be willing to stand up and be counted. We must be willing to act in accordance with what we believe under all circumstances. It is of little value for us to believe one way if we behave contrary to that belief in our private actions or in our public performance.” Dean L. Larsen, Ensign, Nov 1978 © 2007 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

Dare to Do Right.
“‘I dare you!’ are words boys and girls often hear from friends who want you to prove to them that you are brave or strong or daring....A person shows true bravery and strength only when he has the courage to do right...If you accept a dare to do something that is not right, something that Heavenly Father or your parents would not want you to do, you will be left with a sad and disappointed feeling. When you dare to do right you will have a good feeling about yourself.” Rex D. Pinegar, Friend, Oct 1974 © 2007 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.)

Did Harriet Tubman continue to dare to do right even after slavery was abolished? (Yes.)

Harriet Tubman, the Moses of Her People, used the royalties from her book and a small pension from the United States Army to purchase a house in Auburn, New York that she turned it into a home for the aged and needy.

 

POINTS TO PONDER

 
 

Harriet Tubman faced challenges in her life that we most likely will never have to face, but there are other challenges that we will have that will take courage and faith.


What are some of the challenges of today that take courage and faith to dare to do right? (Discuss ideas.)


“The nature of the challenges we face in this life is not nearly so important as what we choose to do about them. When we have the courage and faith to live up to the best we know, we fulfill the purpose for which we came to this earth, and we provide an incentive for others to do the same.” Dean L. Larsen, Ensign, Nov 1978 © 2007 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

Glenn L. Pace shared this experience of a young girls faith and courage, during April 2007 General Conference: “Some time ago I had a delightful conversation with an impressive 16-year-old young woman. I discovered she was the only member of the Church in her high school. I asked her, ‘What is the most difficult challenge you face being the only member?’She was thoughtful and gave a very astute answer: ‘It is believing something is true when everyone else believes it is false, and believing something is wrong when everyone else believes it’s all right.’” © 2007 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. For entire talk see: Do You Know?

 

Quote: “Satan does not want you to be happy. He does not want you to dare to do right. He wants you to be miserable, as he is.”
Ezra Taft Benson, Ensign, May 1989 © 2007 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

 
 

STORY

I Dare Ya!

 

Brady waved good-bye to his mother before walking down the empty hall at Crestdale middle school. “I wish I was still in grade school. Then I could hang out with Cory,” he thought to himself before opening the door to Miss Chugg’s classroom.

Miss Chugg sat at her desk correcting papers while the class worked on their math assignment. Looking up at Brady, she smiled. “Are you a new student?”

Brady nodded his head as he handed her his registration slip.

“Class, this is Brady Benson. I hope you’ll make him feel welcome,” Miss Chugg said before motioning to an empty desk next to the window, “Have a seat and I’ll get a math book for you.”

Brady slid into the desk. “Hi! I’m Doug,” the boy across the aisle quietly said. “Where ya from?”

Doug’s smile helped Brady relax a little. “I’m from Utah. My Dad’s been transferred here to help re-open the copper mine in Buxton.”

“Utah, huh? You a Mormon?” Doug asked.

Mom and Dad had talked to Brady and Cory before they moved and explained that there wouldn’t be very many members of their church in their new town. “You might have to rely on your faith to give you the courage to ‘Dare to Do Right’,” Father had counseled.

Brady’s back straightened. “Some people call us Mormons, but the real name of our church is ‘The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints,’” Brady answered.

Miss Chugg placed the math book on Brady’s desk. “We’re on page twenty-four. Do sections A and B,” she said. “If you have any questions, Doug can help you.”

“I have a couple of friends who are Mormons. Elder Martin and Elder Banks. They’re missionaries for your church,” Doug whispered. “And even though my Dad’s not interested in hearing about your church they come over on their days off and help out. Last week they helped us build our new shed.” Just then the lunch bell rang. “Hey you want to eat lunch with me and my friends?”

“Thanks! I thought for sure I’d have to eat alone,” Brady said.

After school Brady rushed in to tell Mother about his new friends. “I thought it would take weeks before I made friends! Can you believe after just the first day I’ve already got a whole group of friends?

Mother smiled, “Of course I believe it! Who wouldn’t want to be your friend?”

Page 2

   
 

The next day Brady and his new friends were hanging around after school when a shabbily dressed boy with crutches hobbled down the sidewalk.

“Hey Brady, I dare ya to trip him!” Doug whispered.

Brady looked at Doug with disbelief. “Why would I want to do that?”

“Never mind coward! I’ll do it myself.” Doug then walked over to the boy and put his arm around his shoulder, “Hey, Jimmy. How ya doing buddy?”

Fear showed on Jimmy’s face. This wasn’t the first time he had been harassed by Doug and his friends.

Before Jimmy could answer Doug stuck out his foot and the boy tumbled to the ground. Soon the fallen boy was surrounded by boys who were taunting and kicking him. The blood drained from Brady’s face as he watched in horror.

The words, “Dare to do right,” rang in Brady’s head. With a silent prayer Brady searched for the faith and courage he would need. He then pushed his way through the crowd of boys and positioned himself between them and Jimmy.

“What ya doing?” Doug shouted at Brady. “Get out of the way, coward!”

Brady felt an inner strength enter himself. “It takes more courage to dare to do right, than it does to pick on a defenseless little kid!” he replied in a strong calm voice.

Doug opened his mouth to speak, but not a sound came out. The other boys, just stood gaping at Brady as he helped Jimmy to his feet.

“I’m Brady. You okay Jimmy?”

Tears stained Jimmy’s cheeks as he held out his skinned hands.

“Ouch! Your hands are pretty beat up. There’s probably a first aid kit in the office. I’ll go see if I can get something to clean ’em up.”

Brady turned to the group of boys, “Hey Doug, I dare ya to be man enough to tell Jimmy you’re sorry!”

“You’re not going to take that from that gutless wimp! Are ya Doug?” Bruce asked.

Doug turned to the group of boys. “Knock it off!” he said, before walking over to where Jimmy sat. “Hey Jimmy, I, hmm, I’m really sorry for hurting you. I’m a real jerk sometimes!”

Brady tipped his head back and smiled at Doug, “Alright!” he shouted before slipping inside the school doors.

by Margie Nauta Lee © 2007 Living Scriptures, Inc.

 

TREAT TIME

CLICK TO PRINT "Jumble Cake" recipe

Jumble Cake
(Mrs. Fisher's)

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 15 minutes

(This recipe is found in the first cookbook by a former southern slave, “What Mrs. Fisher Knows about Old Southern Cooking: Soups, Pickles, Preserves, Etc.,” published by the Women’s Cooperative Printing Office in San Francisco in 1881.)

[We've adapted it for the modern cook]

Directions:

Beat the butter, sugar and eggs together, then add the flour [with yeast sifted in]. Put cinnamon and almonds in and work the whole up well [mix everything together until well blended].

Treat Time:

Roll on the board to thickness of half an inch [Divide dough evenly among family members. Roll dough into ropes about 1/2 inch in diameter] and cut out a finger’s length [approximately 3 inches] and join together at ends, so as to be round. Grease pans with butter and put to bake [350 degrees F. for 15 minutes].

(Slave families would gather together after a long hard day in the fields or at the house for meals to nourish the body and the soul. It was during these times that family history was told and the slaves
socialized. That is why the recipes from the southern slave states are known as “Soul food.”

While preparing this recipe together follow the example of the southern slaves and nourish your souls by socializing and sharing family memories.)

 

Ingredients

  • 1 teacup [cup] of butter
  • 1-1/2 teacups [cups] of sugar
  • 4 eggs
  • 1-1/2 pints [about 3-2/3 cups] flour
  • 2 tsp. yeast powder sifted into the flour
  • 2 tsp. of cinnamon
  • 1/2 teacup [cup] finely chopped almonds
 

ACTIVITY

 

 

 

 

Activity: Younger children will need help from an older sibling or parent.

1. Learn about these words, associated with the Underground Railroad, by putting train cars together to form a train.
2. Place the train cars face side up on floor or table.
3. Read from the list of sentences one at a time.
4. Have a family member pick the train car to fill in the blank.
5. Discuss the question/statement that goes along with each word.
6. Tape the train cars together as you answer the questions to form your train.
7. Discuss how The Underground Railroad consisted of many faithful and courageous people. Each year it moved hundreds of slaves north. The system was organized because of the moral obligation to free the slaves. It was called “The Underground Railroad,” after the then emerging steam railroads. The “conductor” was responsible for moving runaways from one station to the next. Sometimes a “conductor,” would pose as a slave, enter a plantation and then guide the runaways, at night, north. They would generally travel by foot for 10 to 20 miles to a safe house, where they would rest and eat. While they waited, a message would be sent to the next station to alert its stationmaster. Money was needed to improve the appearance of the runaways. A black man, woman, or child in tattered clothes would attract suspicious eyes. Money was also needed for runaways to sometimes travel by train and boat. Money was raised and donated by abolitionists. In addition to money, abolitionists provided food and shelter and helped the runaways find jobs in their new communities. The Underground Railroad had many notably faithful and courageous participants, including John Fairfield, the son of a slave owner, who made many daring rescues, Levi Coffin, a Quaker who assisted more than 3,000 slaves, and Harriet Tubman, a runaway slave called Moses, who made 17 trips to help free over 150 of her people directly or by providing instructions.
8. Invite your family to get aboard the train of righteousness and “Dare to Do Right” like the many faithful and courageous people, like Harriet Tubman, who were part of the “Underground Railroad.”

Preparation:

1. Print out a copy of the artwork .

2. For ease, cut along dotted lines.

 

What you need:

A copy of the "Build an Underground Railroad with Courage and Faith" activity, scissors and tape.

 

 

 

 

ACTIVITY PAGES

 
       
         
         

MUSIC MP3

 

 

20-MINUTE LESSON

CLICK TO PRINT "20-MINUTE" LESSON NOTES

 

1. Watch chapter 13 from the animated Complete Learning System, Harriet Tubman DVD. (Video clip is also provided for viewing online.)

2. Read Mosiah 8:18
“Thus God has provided a means that man, through faith, might work mighty miracles; therefore he becometh a great benefit to his fellow beings.”

3. Did Harriet Tubman become a great benefit to her fellow beings? (Yes.)

Harriet Tubman dared to do right and despite great hardship and great danger Harriet Tubman courageously lead about 70 slaves to freedom, while her instructions also allowed about 70 more slaves independently find their freedom. She became a great benefit to her fellow beings and her example continues to inspire all who cherish freedom.

4. How can Harriet’s great example help us find joy in our daily lives? (Discuss ideas.)

If you have faith and courage to choose the right and help others every day, even when those around you choose differently, you will be happy and the Lord will bless you and give you strength to do great things.

5. Is it important to stand up for what you know is right? (Yes.)

There were good people who helped Harriet Tubman in her work on the Underground Railroad, but there were many, many, others who didn’t have the faith and courage to help, even though they knew slavery was wrong. “It is not enough for us to know what is right and to believe it is good. We must be willing to stand up and be counted. We must be willing to act in accordance with what we believe under all circumstances. It is of little value for us to believe one way if we behave contrary to that belief in our private actions or in our public performance.” Dean L. Larsen, Ensign, Nov 1978 © 2007 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.

6. Did Harriet Tubman dare to do right? (Yes.)

“‘I dare you!’ are words boys and girls often hear from friends who want you to prove to them that you are brave or strong or daring....A person shows true bravery and strength only when he has the courage to do right...If you accept a dare to do something that is not right, something that Heavenly Father or your parents would not want you to do, you will be left with a sad and disappointed feeling. When you dare to do right you will have a good feeling about yourself.” Rex D. Pinegar, Friend, Oct 1974 © 2007 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.)

7. What are some of the challenges of today that take courage and faith to dare to do right and how will you face these challenges? (Discuss.)

Glenn L. Pace shared this experience of a young girls faith and courage, during April 2007 General Conference: “Some time ago I had a delightful conversation with an impressive 16-year-old young woman. I discovered she was the only member of the Church in her high school. I asked her, ‘What is the most difficult challenge you face being the only member?’ She was thoughtful and gave a very astute answer: ‘It is believing something is true when everyone else believes it is false, and believing something is wrong when everyone else believes it’s all right.’” © 2007 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. For entire talk see: Do You Know?